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ESTEBAN PASTORINO DIAZ

b. 1972,  Buenos Aires, Argentina


Esteban Pastorino Diaz was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina in 1972. In the early 1990’s he studied as an engineer planning to join his father’s gunsmith business. After the death of his father and the sale of the family business, Esteban pursued his passion for art combining his engineering studies.

Over more than two decades, Esteban has exhibited in solo and group shows in galleries and museums around the globe. Major international museums have collected his work including the Art Institute of Chicago, the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and the Museum of Modern Art, Buenos Aires.


While participating in an artist residency in Greece, he started his KAP series. This aerial series was performed with a hand-made camera attached to a kite. The shutter was triggered by remote control. Later, as in the Las Ventas series, he no longer used a kite, which remained a tedious, time-consuming method. His technique changed by photographing from a high perspective with the lens producing short depth of field.


Currently Esteban Pastorino has been working on panoramic images made with a hand constructed stereo panoramic camera. This camera is able to turn 360 degrees on a tripod. Or it can remain stationary while moving in a car or having the subject pass by the camera. In June 2011 he made the longest single photograph negative, 129 feet, 8.5 inches, depicting almost 2 miles of Buenos Aires. He was awarded the Guinness World Record for creating the longest photographic negative, which measured 39.54 meters or 129 feet and 8.69 inches in length.


A retrospective of his work will soon be exhibited (2017) at the Recoleta Cultural Center in Buenos Aires, which will include a 72 image circular stereoscope, 4.5 feet in diameter.


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