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March 29 - May 3, 2008


IGOR MALIJEVSKY: THE SIGNS


Artist Reception

Saturday, March 29, 2008

from 5 pm – 8 pm


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE, DALLAS, TX -  Czech artist and writer, Igor Malijevsky, will have his first solo exhibition at PDNB Gallery. Born in Prague, (now) Czech Republic, in 1970, Igor has focused on photography and literature as his career.


"Signs bring us real messages, which are ungraspable by other means.

Signs can lead us, despite the fact that they remain incomprehensible."

-Igor Malijevsky


Malijevsky's captured moments in time reveal strange phenomena, somewhat like the questionable 19th Century photographs of fairies. But these are real time images, unprovoked, and untouched. Two shark fins protruding from an escalator, an image of a woman superimposed on a building, a fly on the forehead of Mary, these images are puzzling, dark and surreal.


"A sign could be read like an omen. According to the law of physics

we begin to grasp the point always just in the moment when it is already

too late."  - Igor Malijevsky


The Czech artist, Joseph Sudek (1896 - 1976), is the Grandfather of Czech photography. Certainly Igor's imagery pays homage to such brilliant work. But Igor combines his prose with imagery that creates a wonderful essay of moments in time as a comprehensive project. Malijevsky guides us through the Signs that only an Eastern European eye can visualize.


Malijevsky studied theoretical physics and philosophy at Charles University in Prague. Along with his work in photography he contributes to Czech and international periodicals and literary reviews.  He is also a well-known poet and short story writer in his country. His photographs have been exhibited in the U.S. and Europe.




Igor Malejevsky,

Confession, Prague 1996